Communities bloom with cultivation of new services

Helping to improve the lives of people affected by disadvantage has been a key purpose at Carinity for nearly 75 years.

This commitment has reached new heights recently through an expansion of services to support vulnerable people in the community.

Community Services and Improvement Manager Chris Shannon said Carinity had launched a number of new projects in the last 12 months.

“We can help more people who live with disability than ever before, thanks to the opening of a brand new purpose-built house, and the introduction of counselling and therapies that can be funded through the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS),” he said.

As part of the Carinity Connections initiative, volunteers Stuart Prout and Broderick Skinner helped transform a Boonah resident’s yard
Carinity Fassifern Community Centre volunteers Stuart Prout and Broderick Skinner helped transform a Boonah resident’s yard.

“Our commitment to our existing clients has also been re-affirmed with the purchase of one of our disability houses, which we previously leased.

Our community centre has been assisting local residents who need help with yard maintenance thanks to a new community outreach program.

“Of course, Carinity also continues to provide a range of other important community services such as specialist domestic violence counselling and a safe place to call home for young people at risk of homelessness.

“It gives me great satisfaction to know that together, our team is making a real difference to the lives of people who need it.”

 

Disability accommodation

In August last year, Carinity opened a new support service for people living with disability. Sunflower House is a thoughtfully designed home in the Scenic Rim offering respite accommodation for up to 14 days at a time.

A stay at Sunflower House can be fully funded by an individual’s eligible NDIS plan with no out-of-pocket expenses, making it the perfect destination for a country retreat.

When guests visit they will enjoy a welcoming environment with around-the-clock support, personal care, nutritious meals prepared fresh onsite and a fully accessible van to explore the local area.

Kathy Van Der Meulen, Janine Gibson, Rachael Brook and Phillip Fagg at the official opening of Carinity Sunflower House in Kalbar
Kathy Van Der Meulen, Janine Gibson, Rachael Brook and Phillip Fagg at the official opening of Carinity Sunflower House.

 

Mental health

Carinity has expanded its counselling program to include therapies that can be fully funded by an eligible NDIS plan. The new services have been designed specifically for people with disabilities and include counselling, art therapy, play-based therapy, expressive therapies and group therapy.

Counselling and therapies can be beneficial for a range of individuals, including those with physical, psychosocial, sensory, cognitive, neurological and intellectual disabilities. Parents and carers can also receive support to develop skills and understanding of neurodiversity in children and adolescents.

Face-to-face appointments are available in Beaudesert or the Narangba area in north Brisbane, with telehealth appointments available anywhere in Australia.

Diana Clift and Anita Lyons at the new Carinity Youth and Families Narangba premises, where they support NDIS disability service participants
Diana Clift and Anita Lyons at Carinity Narangba, where they support NDIS disability service participants.

 

Disability support

Carinity has solidified its ongoing commitment to the Somerset Region by purchasing the property from which it operates Our House – a home away from home for people with disability.

Our House supports individuals to develop skills, live independently at home, participate in social activities and enjoy respite when needed.

Carinity took over the management of Our House in 2007 and had been leasing the property from the Queensland Government. The acquisition helps to ensure that Our House can continue providing disability services to the local community well into the future.

Carinity Our House support service users Ashleigh Barry, Shane Smith and Hugo Teske.
Carinity Our House support service users Ashleigh Barry, Shane Smith and Hugo Teske.

 

Community outreach

The Carinity Fassifern Community Centre has launched a new community outreach project to help the vulnerable and elderly who are struggling with garden maintenance at home.

Carinity Connections has been designed to assist people in need and help alleviate social isolation in the community. It enables Boonah residents to access help with tasks such as lawn mowing, weeding, rubbish removal, small errands or even moving a piece of furniture.

Gardening equipment and a box trailer used for the program have been funded by Scenic Rim Regional Council’s Community Grant Program.

Services are available on the last Wednesday of each month, delivered by a team of volunteers passionate about sowing the seeds of community connection.

As part of the Carinity Connections initiative, volunteer Broderick Skinner helped transform a Boonah resident’s yard.
Broderick Skinner volunteers for the Carinity Connections initiative, a new community outreach project supporting those struggling with garden maintenance at home.

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